Eating hamburgers, pizza may increase cancer risk: Study

Eating hamburgers, pizza may increase cancer risk: Study

Besides contributing to weight gain in adults, energy dense foods such as hamburgers and pizza may also increase risk of cancer, suggests new research.Read also:Going to gym? Keep in mind these few things

According to a Study:

  • The researchers wanted to find out how the ratio of energy to food weight, otherwise known as dietary energy density (DED).
  • In addition, contributes to cancer risk.
  • They looked at DED in the diets of post-menopausal women.
  • The findings showed that consuming energy dense foods was tied to a 10% increase in obesity-related cancer among normal weight women.
  • The demonstrated effect in normal-weight women in relation to risk for obesity-related cancers is novel," explained lead investigator.
  • "This finding suggests that weight management alone may not protect against obesity-related cancers should women favour a diet pattern indicative of high energy density," expert said.
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Dietary energy density:

  • Dietary energy density is a measure of food quality and the relationship of calories to nutrients.
  • The more calories per gram of weight a food has, the higher its DED.
  • Whole foods, including vegetables, fruits, lean protein, and beans are considered low in energy density.
  • Because they provide a lot of nutrients using very few calories.
  • Processed foods, like hamburgers and pizza, are consider high in energy density.
  • In addition, because you need a larger amount to get necessary nutrients.
  • In order to gain a better understanding of how DED alone relates to cancer risk.
  • Researchers used data on 90,000 postmenopausal women including their diet and any diagnosis of cancer.
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Researchers:

  • The researchers believe that the higher dietary energy density foods in normal-weight women.
  • Furthermore, may cause metabolic dysregulation that is independent of body weight, which is a variable known to increase cancer risk.
  • While further study is needed to understand how dietary energy density.
  • May play a role in cancer risk for other populations such as young people and men.
  • This information may help persuade postmenopausal women to choose low energy dense foods.
  • Furthermore,even if they are already at a healthy body mass index.

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